LDS Lesson Ideas

Rainier Oregon Stake

TEMPLE BLESSINGS

Come Listen to a Prophet’s Voice

TEMPLE

Inasmuch as my people build a house unto me in the name of the Lord . . . my glory shall rest upon it (Doctrine and Covenants 97:15).

Great blessings for ourselves and for our families come from going to the temple. We can live worthy of these blessings by obeying the
commandments. President James E. Faust talked about these blessings. Here are some of the things he said.

You may want to talk about them with your parents.

We are living in the greatest day of temple building. . . . The faithful Saints who pay their tithes and offerings have made this possible, and each will receive eternal blessings. . . . Each temple building is an inspiration, magnificent and beautiful in every way, but the temple building alone does not bless. The . . . blessings . .
come through obedience and faithfulness to priesthood authority and covenants made. . . .

In the magnificence and splendor of our modern temples, well might we pause and reflect upon the laborers without shirts and shoes who built the Nauvoo and Kirtland Temples. Each temple that stands today is a vindication of Joseph and Hyrum Smith and a triumph for them and all of our people who suffered the destruction, the beatings, and the
murders at the hands of cruel tyrants in the mobs who drove our people west. . . .

In the temples of the Lord, we learn obedience. We learn sacrifice. We . . . have our lives consecrated to holy purposes. . . . We can see in vision the countless couples in their youth and beauty coming to be married. We see clearly the unspeakable joy on their countenances (faces) as they are sealed together [for eternity]. . . . We can see unnumbered families surrounding the altar, all clothed in white, with bowed heads and clasped hands, as they are sealed one to another. . . . We can see the army of angelic
young children . . . coming to the house of the Lord with awe and wonder to be baptized for the dead.

We see . . . heavenly hosts unnumbered whose eternal odysseys (journeys) have been suspended as they wait for their vicarious work to be done. . . . We can see families dancing, shouting, and crying
with joy in their being united in another world. The spirit and blessings of the temple can fill our homes as we live worthy lives. Even before we are old enough to go to the temple, we can prepare our hearts by being obedient and choosing the right. When we do go to the temple, we can share its blessings with our ancestors.

Filed under: Come Listen to a Prophet’s Voice, , , ,

HONESTY

Speak the truth in soberness (Doctrine and Covenants 18:21).
Every prophet has taught the importance of being honest.

President James E. Faust, Second Counselor in the First
Presidency, shares some examples of young people who
told the truth when it would have been easier to lie.

A M o r a l C o m p a s s

We all need to know what it means to be honest. Honesty is more
than not lying. It is truth telling, truth speaking, truth living,
and truth loving. John, a nineyear-old Swiss pioneer child who
was in one of the handcart companies, is an example of honesty.
His father put a chunk of buffalo meat in the handcart and said it was to be saved for Sunday dinner. John said, “I was so very hungry
and the meat smelled so good to me while pushing at the handcart that I could not resist. I had a little pocket knife. . . .
Although I expected a severe whipping when father found it out, I
cut off little pieces each day. I would chew them so long that they got white and perfectly tasteless. When father came to get the meat he asked me if I had been cutting off some of it. I said ‘Yes. I was so hungry I could not let it alone.’ Instead of giving me a scolding
or whipping, father turned away and wiped tears from his eyes.”

Honesty is a moral compass to guide us in our lives. . . . I would like to tell you a story of an excellent athlete—a young man with superb character. He never went to the Olympics, but he stands as tall as any Olympian because he was honest with himself and with his God. The account is told by a coach in a junior high school. He states: “Today was test day in climbing the rope. We climb from a standing start to a point 15 feet high. . . .“The school record for the event is 2.1 seconds. It has stood for three years. Today this record was broken. . . . “For three years Bobby Polacio, a 14 /2-year-old ninth grade . . . boy, [trained and worked, consumed by his dream] of breaking this record. “In his first of three attempts,
Bobby climbed the rope in 2.1 seconds, tying the record. On the second try the watch stopped at 2.0 seconds flat, a record! But
as he descended the rope and the entire class gathered around to check the watch, I knew I must ask Bobby a question. There was a
slight doubt in my mind whether or not the board at the 15 foot height had been touched. If he missed, it was so very, very close—not more than a fraction of an inch—and only Bobby knew this answer.
“As he walked toward me, expressionless, I said, ‘Bobby, did you touch?’ If he had said, ‘Yes,’ the record he had dreamed of since he was a skinny seventh-grader and had worked for almost daily would be
his, and he knew I would trust his word. “With the class already
cheering him for his performance, the slim, brown-skinned boy shook his head negatively. And in this simple gesture, I witnessed a moment
of greatness. . . . “. . . And it was with effort through a tight throat that I told the class: ‘This boy has not set a record in the rope climb. No, he has set a much finer record for you and everyone to strive for. He has told the truth.’ “I turned to Bobby and said,
‘Bobby, I’m proud of you. You’ve just set a record many athletes never attain. Now, in your last try I want you to jump a few inches higher on the takeoff.’ . . . “After the other boys had finished
their next turns, and Bobby came up . . . for his try, a strange stillness came over the gymnasium. Fifty boys and one coach [watched]
breathlessly [as] Bobby Polacio . . . climbed the rope in 1.9
seconds! A school record, a city record, and perhaps close to a
national record for a junior high school boy.

“When the bell rang and I walked away, . . . I was thinking: ‘Bobby, . . . at 14 you are a better man than I. Thank you for climbing so very, very high today.’ ” All of us can climb high when we honor every form of truth.

(Ensign, November 1996, pages 41–44.)

Filed under: Come Listen to a Prophet’s Voice, Lesson 37: I Can Be Honest, , , , ,

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